How To Improve Your Images On Pinterest

Today’s post is another Pinterest tips bonanza. You can find my other Pinterest advice posts HERE, all of which contain easy to digest tips on how to improve your images on Pinterest – and your account in general – whether you’re a blogger or a business.

How to improve your images on Pinterest. Tips for Pinterest, advice for Pinterest. How to use Pinterest as a blogger or a business. #talontedlex #bloggingtips #pinteresttips

If you came here looking for rosacea advice, nail art, or weird make up I can only apologise but all of those search terms have direct links to content that might be more up your street, and there will be some beauty related content coming soon, I promise!

So you’ve followed all my tips on how to sort out your Pinterest account and you’re well on your way to absolutely smashing this Pinterest stuff. So how do you ensure that your amazing content is attracting eyeballs and getting shared? Easy. You need to create beautiful and useful Pinterest-optimised images. It sounds trickier than it is,  but don’t worry. Here are the four main rules to bear in mind to improve your images on Pinterest:

  • Your images should always be portrait (2:3). Yes, it means a little bit extra work as you can’t just share your instagram or landscape blog images. But portrait images do so much better on Pinterest – this is because so many people use Pinterest on their phones (~80% of users!) and a square/landscape image quickly gets lost and scrolled off the screen. This is the big one and even if you completely ignore tips 2, 3, and 4, you will already be ahead of the curve.
  • In my experience, lifestyle shots are a lot more engaging than a plain white background. Pinterest is a place of inspiration and planning for most people, so if you show them how to style something, or showcase how that product or item fits into your life then you’re removing a step in the user’s imagination. It’s why a photo of a moisturiser on a dressing table will tend to do better than a floating bottle on a white background.
  • Text overlays are the best way to stop people scrolling past your image. You may have the most beautiful shot of a beach in the Maldives but – chances are – if the user is searching for Maldives holiday inspiration, the whole page is filled with beautiful beach photos! But if your image had some bright pink text across the image saying ‘Things you NEED to know before you visit the MALDIVES’ you’re more likely to get those clicks. Think like a Buzzfeed clickbait headline writer (but don’t be one of those clickbait people who can’t back it up with actual interesting information in the post!) I use Canva or Easil to easily add text, both of which have free account options.
  • Do some testing to see what works for you. A few years ago there were some best practice tips floating around that said that Pinterest images with faces in didn’t do as well, and that warmer tones tended to do better than cool ones. I can’t find anything from Pinterest to confirm or deny this, but I will say that it’s good practice to do some testing to see what resonates with your audience. If you have the time – or patience – I would recommend creating 2 Pinterest-optimised images for each blog post/product. You might want to try different text overlays, colour themes, or layouts – it’s your opportunity to try out something new. Both Canva and Easil have some great pre-made designs that will inspire you.

And that’s that! Follow these four tips and tricks and your content will work harder for longer, sending you lots of lovely traffic and increasing your engagement. If you have any questions, just leave them below and I will try to help. Oh and while you’re here, come follow me on Pinterest!

Lex

==PIN ME FOR LATER==

How to improve your images on Pinterest. Tips for Pinterest, advice for Pinterest. How to use Pinterest as a blogger or a business. #talontedlex #bloggingtips #pinteresttips

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